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Vitra Miniatures Collection: Castiglioni Mezzadro

Vitra Miniatures Collection: Castiglioni Mezzadro

Designed by Achille and Pier Giacomo Castiglioni, produced by Vitra Design Museum

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Item Number: 122
$250.00
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Description

Each handmade Vitra miniature is a classic in the history of furniture design reduced in size at a scale of 1:6. True to the original pieces in structure and materials, the miniatures are precision-crafted, making them a thoughtful gift for a furniture lover or design professional. On the occasion of the XIth Milan Triennial in 1957, Achille and Pier Giacomo Castiglioni presented their first prototype for the Mezzadro. The stool went on show in its current form that same year in an interior setting displayed at the Colori e forme nella casa d’oggi exhibition in the Villa Olmo in Como. The designers used a common tractor seat for the springy metal seat, fastening it with a wing nut to the spring-based arched steel strip utilized in tractors to absorb the shock of uneven ground. They enhanced the stability of the cantilever structure by a wooden cross-strut that resembled the rungs of a wooden ladder. Each of these parts clearly embodies its task as a part of a functional whole. And what strikes the eye is the recourse to an artistic method exemplified by Marcel Duchamp's found objects or Pablo Picasso's assemblages. The Castiglionis considered a design successful only once they had managed to eliminate all the unnecessary components and an optimal formal expression had been found for this concentration on the essential. Each miniature comes handsomely packaged in a wood box with an informational booklet.

Designer

Achille Castiglioni
Achille Castiglioni

ITALY (1918–2002)

Achille Castiglioni’s designs were often inspired by everyday things and made use of ordinary materials like extruded aluminum and stainless steel. The genius of his inventive imagination was in his ability to use the minimal amount of materials while creating forms with a maximum effect. “Start from scratch, stick to common sense, and know your goals and means,” he often told ...

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Product Details

Dimensions

H 3.5" W 3.25" D 3.5"

Materials

Chrome-plated and lacquered steel; beech wood.

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