Item No. 100190101

Isamu Noguchi Akari - Sun

C$ 65.00
Item No. 100190101

Isamu Noguchi Akari - Sun

C$ 65.00
Estimated Arrival: In stock and ready to ship
  • 19"x24" screen prints on washi paper designed by Isamu Noguchi.
  • To preserve the texture, hang without a frame, or in a floating frame.
  • The paper can be quite fragile, so please handle with care.

Shipping Options

  • Ships via FedEx

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DWR honors a one (1) year warranty on all products. Brand-specific warranties may extend to longer periods.
Designed by Isamu Noguchi
Isamu Noguchi Akari - Sun
C$ 65.00
Art history — The Akari Prints are an ephemeral ode to Japanese tradition with a nod to modern design.
Details

Details

Wishy washi

Isamu Noguchi's Akari Prints celebrate traditional Japanese craftsmanship in the use of washi paper - the same paper Noguchi used to construct his iconic Akari Lanterns. Noguchi originally created the prints in 1954 for the Chuo Koron exhibition. Akari - a Japanese term meaning light as illumination - also implies the idea of weightlessness. The delicate prints can appear slightly wrinkled and have a texture unlike standard paper prints. Made in Japan.
  • 19"x24" screen prints on washi paper designed by Isamu Noguchi.
  • To preserve the texture, hang without a frame, or in a floating frame.
  • The paper can be quite fragile, so please handle with care.
  • Avoid direct sunlight and liquid cleaners.
  • Made in Japan.
General Dimensions
  • 24" H 19" W
Assembly
Comes fully assembled
Warranty
DWR honors a one (1) year warranty on all products. Brand-specific warranties may extend to longer periods.

1AG

  • Height (in): 24
  • Width (in): 19
  • Washi paper
Isamu Noguchi

Isamu Noguchi

Perhaps more than any other midcentury master, Isamu Noguchi blurred the lines between public and personal, between art and design. His career was defined by experimenting, learning and creating. “You can find out how to do something and then do it,” he said, “or do something and then find out what you did.”

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